cerebral palsy

Joe’s Walking essay

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Joseph Padalino aiming his camera. (Meredith Arout/Lifestyles)

My day of being in a wheelchair is horrible. It’s horrible because of my circumstance. I want to be able to walk like other people. I want to kick a ball like other people. I want to be like a normal person. Not because I’m normal now, you know what I mean? I want to be more normal than the average person. Physically, I can’t go to the bathroom by myself, feed myself, put my shirt on or go in the pool. I want to be able to do more things on my own. I want less help.

The reason why I’m revealing my feelings about walking is because I want people to understand what I’m going through.  Sometimes when I go home, I listen to Josh Groban. And I go in my room and listen to him and I cry. I cry because I sometimes get very emotional about this and crying releases tension. 

I like coming to Lifestyles because it brings me to a place where I have friends. It is not a babysitting service. Lifestyles is a structural program, which teaches us to go out into the workforce. It also gives us an opportunity to expand our minds.

And it gives us a chance to shine. Lifestyles hais a social basis where people come and be happy. And this is why I feel good when I come here. We learn to properly introduce ourselves. I enjoy interviewing people on camera and off. We take pictures and learn to be photographers. So when I come to Lifestyles, I feel like I have a purpose. I feel very special because Lifestyles got me a camera that I can put on my tray, so I can take pictures.

There is an invention called [Robotic] Exoskeleton that you put on like a jacket and you can walk. It has worked with some people, but for me, I don’t know. If you take a picture of my spine, it’s curved. So I don’t know how the Exoskeleton would work. I hope someday in the near future it would. The first thing I would do is go on a plane and take a trip to Italy to see my cousins. I did it once, but there were people to lift me. I want to actually walk by myself.

I enjoyed dictating this essay because it gave me a chance to tell you what I go through everyday in a wheelchair. I hope you read my story because I want everybody to know what I’m going through. Thank you everybody for listening and have a good day.

Joseph Padalino attends Lifestyles for the Disabled day habilitation program. This essay was dictated to Acewin Tam, an intern from Staten Island Technical High School, and Kathryn Carse with the Lifestyles M

“My Chair, Freddy” -Joe Padalino Editorial

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Joseph Padalino and his chair, “Freddy.” Photo: Dolores Palermo for Life-Wire News Service.

So, I am getting a new chair, but I want to talk to you about my friend Freddy, that’s my old chair. Excuse me if I get a little emotional because Freddy means a lot to me. Freddy was my friend.

When I had to say goodbye to Freddy for the very last time, I was very sad. That day my father was with me and I wanted to cry on his shoulder because I couldn’t believe that that was the last time I was going to see Freddy ever again.

I was sad because I could no longer sit inside Freddy.

People sometimes dismiss these feelings – my emotional attachment to my chair — but Freddy was alive to me. I gave Freddy a voice.

Before Freddy, I had a manual chair. This current chair is named Viper. Viper has a lot of markings because I am a restless driver. But these are my markings. Viper is a warrior.

Viper will go to Jersey for my backup chair. My new chair is named Amanda. Amanda is blue and bigger, feisty and quicker, but I don’t know much more about Amanda yet.

What I want people to really believe is that all my chairs mean a lot to me. To some of you, I know this is silly, but this is coming straight from the heart. If you have something that is your friend, cherish it.

– Joseph Padalino with Kathryn Carse

Photos by Dolores Palermo for Life-Wire News Service.

Living with Cerebral Palsy

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Joseph Padalino discusses his life with cerebral palsy, his challenges, the highlights of his life, and his message to others who live with cerebral palsy.

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Joseph Padalino viewing the Living with Cerebral Palsy video with his family.  Photo 2: (left-right) Anne, Sergio and Joseph Padalino.  Photos: Charles Rivera.